Tag Archives: white background

Photographing the 2015 Boston Blizzard: Part 2 The Artistic/Macro approach

I know spring is coming but let’s rewind a little bit to this blizzard we underwent during this winter because it offered very interesting things. So how do you photograph extreme conditions in a way nobody does? It depends on the way you look at it.

Part 1 of this series had a common approach winter photography, mostly from a landscape photography point of view. Here, I wanted to explore the situation with a different eye. I wanted to look at perspectives that people wouldn’t see by themselves. I wanted to look at those tiny things that we would forget, but that the camera lens can make us see differently, thanks to the depth of field and bokeh that our eye cannot reproduce naturally.

 Pure Macro Close-ups

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1 to 1.5 inch for this icicle. The sun gave me this refraction bokeh.

By the way, just imagine one second if we could control our depth of field just with our iris? Wouldn’t that be incredible? Swiss researchers have created the first eye contact lens able to zoom x2.8 just with a blink! Amazing! Anyway, that was the revolutionary high-tech parenthesis. Continue reading Photographing the 2015 Boston Blizzard: Part 2 The Artistic/Macro approach

Photographing the 2015 Boston Blizzard – (Part 1: The Ghost City)

A record breaking winter. Yes, this is what this winter is in Boston. With 104 inches (2m64) of snow so far (March 1st) since the beginning of this incredible winter, it’s the second snowiest winter ever in Boston with a record at 107 inches (2m71). February already hit the 1st place as the snowiest month in the history of Boston.

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Almost 72 inches here (2m) and the wind blowing.

In terms of temperature, it is also one of the coldest winter ever. With some temperatures at -13F (-25C) and reaching -24F (-31C) with wind chill. This is also one of the reasons why the bay of Boston froze.

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Boston’s bay all frozen like a floe from Quincy. You can see Boston’s skyline in the horizon.

Of course, the Charles River is all frozen, but it’s more unusual concerning the ocean! Unless you live in the north pole or…in Canada eh? 😉 You probably saw the frozen wave photographed in the south of Boston, in a tiny island called Nantucket (watch here)? Boston is currently more or less in the same situation as Fairbanks, Alaska. You read it correctly, “Alaska”. Continue reading Photographing the 2015 Boston Blizzard – (Part 1: The Ghost City)

How to Shoot like Terry Richardson – (Part 3: The Results)

In Part 1 and Part 2 of this series, we explored the look and setup used by Terry Richardson to achieve his iconic and rule breaking style of fashion photography. After eight photo shoots spanning from Boston all the way to California, we are finally wrapping up this photo study. I’ll break down what I’ve learned over these eight shoots, give some insight into the shooting process, and also provide some helpful post-processing tips on achieving the Terry-inspired look yourself.

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Candice Swanepoel with Terry Richardson, image from terrysdiary.com

To reiterate, the core of Terry’s genius is his ability to connect with the models. His style is raw, uncensored, and full of energy. His style is an inspiration to us at iLHP and though no one can replicate Terry besides Terry himself, we do hope to share our own interpretation.

Continue reading How to Shoot like Terry Richardson – (Part 3: The Results)

How to Shoot like Terry Richardson – (Part 2: The Setup)

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Last time in Part 1, we started to explore Terry Richardson’s iconic snapshot style that’s influenced a generation of photographers and created the modern look for fashion photography. Controversies aside, Uncle Terry breaks the traditional “rules” with his use of harsh direct lighting and a shadow that hugs the model. In this part, we will discuss his setup and the gear you can buy to achieve that look.

Terry’s Methodology

Behind the scenes video of his Harper Bazaar shoot with Candice Swanepoel
Behind the scenes video of his Harper Bazaar shoot with Candice Swanepoel (click for the video)

A good way of understanding the magic behind his camera is to check out his behind-the-scene videos and interviews. With music rocking and a team of assistants behind him, his shoots are laid back yet up tempo. It’s fast, dynamic, and interactive. From these stills, you can see he shoots with a Nikon (D3X I think) and a single speed-light.

Continue reading How to Shoot like Terry Richardson – (Part 2: The Setup)

How to Shoot like Terry Richardson – (Part 1: The Look)

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Whether or not you have heard of him, you’ve probably has seen his work. From Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar to H&M and American Apparel, his white-background-with-hard-direct-flash-portraits has been the iconic look of the recent times. Pay attention the next time you go shopping, and just realize just how many billboards and ads are shot clean, on a white background, with very little shadow. The Terry Richardson look, then, has defined this generation of fashion photography.

In a month long exposé, I will delve into “Terry’s World,” the craft behind his work, and learn how to shoot models in his style. He is the first mega-pro photographer to be featured, discussed, and analyzed here at iLHP and it’s strangely fitting because people either love or hate him and his work, literally. 

Hack or Genius? 

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RollingStone’s Behind the Scenes Video for the Rihanna Shoot

Photographers, professional or amateur but mostly amateur, are highly polarized about his work. To use comedian Bill Burr’s expression, “naysayers with heavy jowls” criticize his point-and-shoot style as amateurish, unsophisticated, or even tacky (classic argument is that “my four-year old niece can do it,” but I’ve yet to see a four your old exhibit at the MET). Throw a question like “Is Terry Richardson any good?” onto an online forum and watch the feces fly like a good ol’ Canon v. Nikon debate. But we’ve all heard this before. Jackson Pollock’s talentless splatter paintings, I.M. Pei’s monstrous Louvre glass pyramids, or even Pablo Picasso’s amateurish cubism. Good art is sure to stir some controversy. Art is supposed to make you feel something.

Continue reading How to Shoot like Terry Richardson – (Part 1: The Look)