Tag Archives: sony a7ii

What To Expect From The Sony A7III Now That the A9 Has Been Announced?

We are used to see Sony release new cameras at a tremendous pace. Each and every year we have a new camera. The A7II has been released just a year after the A7, same for the A7r/ A7rII and A7s/A7sII. The A7rII is literally a flagship for Sony as it encompasses all the new technologies Sony has been working on the past few years, especially with the 5 axis stabilization combined with the world premier full frame back-lit sensor. Until the A9 has been announced on April 19th, 2017. The A9 is clearly a game changer. I know I know, we have been saying this for every single A7 that has been released the past couple years. But the A9 has a different flavor. The high-end professional flavor that was missing in the mirrorless world and that just put an end to the endless debate between DSLRs and mirrorless bodies. It brings the credibility, especially in terms of focusing capabilities, that mirrorless needed the most. That is not all of course but one of the main feature that will definitely kill DSLRs. One can still argue on the size of the body being too small for his/her hand but the fact is that performance wise, the A9 buries its competitors, including the kings Canon 1DX and Nikon D5, and icing on the cake, it is up to $2000 less expensive than its famous competitors. We’re not going to detail all the great features housed by the A9 as there are plenty of reviews out there for that but instead, I’d like to imagine what the A7markIII would be like, now that the new A9 flagship has been announced and shows what Sony has been up to. That tells us a little bit more on the way Sony is taking.

Sony A9 specs

But would it be accurate or fair? As a matter of fact, comparing the A7III that will be the entry level to the A9 that is the high-end pro model could be sort of… inappropriate. But we can expect Sony to introduce some of these new technologies to the newer bodies in order to ensure to stay ahead in the mirrorless run, or even in the Full Frame interchangeable cameras since Sony just took over Nikon in that field recently. In the past, Sony has always introduced the A7 then A7r and quickly after the A7s series, we can reasonably expect the next body to be the A7III.

However, it is important to note that the A7II was released in January 2015, a little bit more than 2 years ago which means that Sony decided to change and slow down its pace in renewing its cameras and instead work on the lenses offer. It is a good and a bad thing some would say, I will let you be the judge. But in my opinion, this is a very good thing. First, it will settle down the image of the cameras and they will lose less value over time, making them appear more credible and valuable against CaNikon competitors, and second, it shows that Sony is focusing more on developing the E-mount lenses, bringing more credibility to the system. Knowing this, we can assume that this system will reach maturity by the end of 2017 ( especially since Zeiss declared to iLHP being ready to release 2-3 others E-mount lenses in 2017). Considering the success of this system, third party manufacturers will also get more involved and start to make lenses as well. Sony A7rII iLHPSigma, for instance, has been stressed a lot in the past few months by A7 consumers and prosumers to produce their ART series for the E-mount. From the latest developments, it sounds like Sigma will soon release some E-mount lenses, which will add up to the already Sony and Zeiss offer as well as Rokinon/Samyang and some others.In total, that is more than 50 lenses that are available for the E-mount system. And the professional G-Master series is growing quickly, introducing the 100-400mm G with the A9 for sports photographers.

Sony will obviously keep innovating. This will not end here. They literately attacked Canon and Nikon by creating a new market and taking a significant share of the whole DSLR/mirrorless market. They’re now targeting their professional market, exactly where no one else could compete, not even close. Without a doubt, Canon and Nikon will react within a year or two, at least they should! Sony knows this and is obviously working on the A7II successor that we might be expecting for January 2018 if they want to stay ahead of the game.

What can we expect from an A7 mark III?

Sony A9 and A7rII size comparison
Size comparison between the A7rII and the A9. The A9 is mostly identical except for the grip that is a little bit more prominent and height is surprisingly one millimeter smaller. Weight is 673g, just 73g more than the A7II.

Continue reading What To Expect From The Sony A7III Now That the A9 Has Been Announced?

The Curious Case of the Wide-Normal Primes – Sony 28mm f/2 vs. Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2 Distagon

The wide-normal prime is somewhat of an oddity. Nestled between the 17mm & 20mm ultra-wides and the 35mm & 40mm normals, the wide-normal primes sit comfortably, or awkwardly (depending on who you ask), in the 24mm to 28mm range.

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Shot handheld with a Sony 28mm f/2. The wide-normal prime is arguably the most versatile consumer prime lens.

In this lens shootout, we took two of the newest and most anticipated primes for the Sony FE mount to the Orange County County Fair. The County Fair is a public event that brings family and friends together for carnival games, petting zoos, and bacon. Lots and lots of bacon.

In typical iLHP lens review fashion, our tests will be broken down in several rounds as listed below:

  1. Sharpness and Distortion
  2. Vignetting and Flare
  3. Bokeh and 3D Pop
  4. Field of View
  5. Real World Handling

The Contenders & Their Specs

photographicwanderings
(c) John vR @ photographicwanderings.com. Despite the Batis’ larger size, it doesn’t weigh that much more than the Sony, and it’s materials are beautiful.

On the left, weighing in at a welterweight of 335g with a $1,299 price tag, is the brand new OLED displayed Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2 Distagon. On the right, weighing in at a featherweight 200g with an equally wallet-easy $448 price tag, is the Sony 28mm f/2.

Both have completely silent AF systems. Both come with pedal-shaped lens hoods. The Zeiss blows the Sony out of the water in terms of build quality, what with its high quality plastics that resemble metal and the world’s first OLED focus scale. But at almost 3x the price, the build quality is expected and, honestly, necessary. The Sony is minimal yet still built very well. No complaints for either lenses then.

Continue reading The Curious Case of the Wide-Normal Primes – Sony 28mm f/2 vs. Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2 Distagon

Is It Worth Using a 2X Teleconverter? Bower A-mount With Sony A7II (With LA-EA4 Adapter)

I’ve been wondering for a very long time if using a teleconverter, moreover a 2x one, was worth it or not. I’ve heard a lot on forums that I would lose light, the aperture is reduced 2x (f/2.8 becomes f/5.6) that it is not sharp at all and that I would even lose autofocus. That made me doubt a lot even if it is not that expensive, but still, from $120 to $180 on average, that is always money coming out of you wallet that would be lost in the end if this is really bad!

The Situation

I use this Sigma 150mm f2.8 APO macro lens for all my macro work that is very good but also big and heavy. I wanted to have this extra reach to do some wildlife photography without adding the bulk and weight to my backpack and without paying $1500-$2000 for a 300mm lens. A teleconverter then seemed like a good idea so I gave it shot. I bought this Bower Teleconverter on Amazon for $126.

Bower SX4DGS 2x Teleconverter for Sony
Bower SX4DGS 2x Teleconverter for Sony
I am extremely pleased with my purchase. This adapter is pretty small, 1 inch (2.5cm) wide, about 7oz (200g) so this is not much of a big deal to always have it with me in my backpack. As a reminder, I shoot with an Sony A7 mark II and use the Sony LA-EA4 adapter specifically for this Sigma lens. I thus add the teleconverter (A-mount) in between the lens and the LA-EA4 adapter. Continue reading Is It Worth Using a 2X Teleconverter? Bower A-mount With Sony A7II (With LA-EA4 Adapter)

Who are the Professional Photographers who Switched to the Sony A7 Series?

We keep on hearing a lot about the A7 series and that many pros are leaving their beloved DSLRs for this new series of cameras. Especially with the latest announcement with the A7r mark II (7 game changing features of the A7rII) which, undeniably, is a breakthrough in the aging DSLR world. Seeing the A7 mark II (A7II Field test) and now the A7rII, I can’t help thinking that, excepted for the Nikon D810 and the D750, all other DSLRs are now a huge step behind considering the new possibilities and the versatility that this new camera offers.

Canon with its brand new 5Ds and 5Dsr did not really convince anybody. DxOLab said it is Canon’s best score ever but it is still ranked at the 21st position, far behind the Nikon D810 and the Sony A7r. Let’s imagine the score of the A7rII. Phenomenal. Don’t take me wrong though, the 5DIII is still a very good camera, but it needs a major overhaul to fight against the upcoming A7rII. That being said, some professionals have already made the switch seeing the great potential in these new kind of full frame cameras, probably even more once the A7rII will be available. So I wanted to provide an example of some great professional photographers that are pleased with their new system.

“I’ve got the greatest job in the world. My worst days as a photographer might be the greatest days in the lives of many people.” — Brian Smith

sony-a7II-vs-nikon-d810-Nikon d4- iLHP size comparison

Serge Ramelli (his 2 websites here: 1 / 2), Michael Shainblum,  Brian Smith and David Mclain are among these, respectively switching from the Canon 5DIII to the A7r and from the Canon 5DII to the A7s, Brian and David, as Sony Artisans, are using several Sony cameras. Trey Ratcliff is also a fantastic pro photographer shooting with the A7r and the A6000. I’m not talking about Jason Lanier switching from Nikon to the A7s as he is really not my favorite photographer, same for Gary Fong but I put the link and you can check it out for yourself. But besides them, amateurs and enthusiasts photographers switching to the A7 series, there are also more and more “common” professional photographers making the switch like wedding photographers. Will Chao is one of them. He has just switched from the Canon 5DIII, again, to the A7 mark II. Continue reading Who are the Professional Photographers who Switched to the Sony A7 Series?

What’s In My Camera Bag?

We all have different needs and we like to shoot a lot of different things, but we’re always curious to know what is in the other’s camera bag. What gear, what accessory does he use to get these shots? Like some other photographers in our interviews at iLHP, today, I thought I’d share with you a part of my “secret”: the composition of my camera bag.

Sony A7II_Sigma_Rokinon_Cullmann_NEX_Vivitar_Alpha_Peak_Design_what'sin my bag_iLHP

As a reminder, I mostly shoot macro but I’m starting to do architectural photography and always enjoy shooting lansdcapes, cityscapes and nature photography. My bag is a bag made for hiking, nothing special about photography, I just wanted something inexpensive (I prefer to spend my money into gear and travels) but it needed to be comfortable. Nothing is better than a hiking back-pack with a belt around the hips when you have some weight to carry. I put my lenses into the blue/grey bag to protect them and put it into the big bag. The rest of the accessories are distributed into different pockets of the bag. I use the Capture from Peak Design to attach it easily on the back-pack strap. It’s easy to attach it and to take it off quickly to shoot. I also use the Cuff, also from Peak Design to secure it around my wrist. Continue reading What’s In My Camera Bag?