Tag Archives: germany

4+1 Photography Tips for the Business Traveler

Imagine this scene. You’ve been walking through the forest/city for days, mentally preparing yourself for the moment your subject/scene will appear before you. You know your camera, you’ve studied the weather, the lighting, the time, you can even see with your mind’s eye that one image that you want to capture. Finally, the time and place is right. Your subject is there, the light is right, the camera is purring in your hands. You look through the viewfinder, you feel the rush, the connection between you and that small part of the world you see in front of you. Click. The perfect photo. The trip was worth it.

A view of the Forbidden City in Beijing, China. A little known fact is that, according to my dodgy guide (who even introduced me to the last nephew of the last emperor, not a scam, promise) entry to the City was not forbidden, it was just that males entering the city had to be castrated to do so - which justifies the name. An even lesser-known fact is that I hiked up the hill in Jingshan Park behind the Forbidden city to take this photo wile every hung-over from a late dinner with collaborators in a business suit.
A view of the Forbidden City in Beijing, China. A little known fact is that, according to my dodgy guide (who even introduced me to the last nephew of the last emperor, not a scam, promise) entry to the City was not forbidden, it was just that males entering the city had to be castrated to do so – which justifies the name. An even lesser-known fact is that I hiked up the hill in Jingshan Park behind the Forbidden city to take this photo while very hung-over from a late dinner with collaborators – in a business suit.

The above scenario is what dedicated photography trips are all about. You choose the place, the time and think about the images you want to come away with. Most importantly, you have set aside a good amount of time to allow you to concentrate on getting that perfect image. That means time to explore the scene, time to try different viewpoints and techniques, time to make sure that as many of the key elements of your image come together before that crucial final capture. This is the stuff photographers’ dreams are made of and the reason why people pay considerable sums of money to embark on these highly organised and professional led trips.

A view along the river Rhine in Strasbourg, France. Camera on a portable mini tripod, photo taken while eating a decidedly mediocre lunch with a work colleague.
A view along the river Rhine in Strasbourg, France. Camera on a portable mini tripod, photo taken while eating a decidedly mediocre lunch with a work colleague.

What if you don’t have the time and/or money to do that though? What if you do have the opportunity to travel, say since work sends you to different places around the country/world, but not the dedicated time to allow you to take photos? Is it time to give up, take some quick snapshots through the taxi, buy a souvenir at the airport on your way out and call it quits? Not to fear fellow business traveller, photography beyond casual snapshots and selfies is still possible, provided you’ve done a bit of homework and are dedicated enough to make it happen. Let’s see how you can have your cake and eat it.

A view from the top of St Peter's Cathedral in Munich, Germany. One of the good things about work travel is that lunch time can usually be your time and is also a time where popular spots are free of tourists. In this case I didn't have to cue up to climb to the top of the bell tower, which meant that I was up, photographing and down within 40 minutes.
A view from the top of St Peter’s Cathedral in Munich, Germany. One of the good things about work travel is that lunch time can usually be your time and is also a time where popular spots are free of tourists. In this case I didn’t have to cue up to climb to the top of the bell tower, which meant that I was up, photographing and down within 40 minutes.

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Cinematic Photography by “Variety of Light”

The is something about the look and feel of movies that’s captured the public attention for over a hundred years. Maybe it’s the size of the silver screen that makes its stories and emotions larger than life. Maybe it’s the unforgettable characters that become a part of our lives. Or maybe it’s the way we see the world through lenses and film.

Photography has always been a rival sibling to cinema. While blockbuster movies gets all the glory and attention, a single still frame can be hauntingly more powerful than we can ever imagine. So when somebody combines the best of cinema and still photography, the effect is that much more powerful.

iLHP is proud to feature Herbert from Variety of Light and his cinematic still photography. There is a melancholic beauty to his images. We spoke with the man and tried to understand the inspirations behind his beautiful photographs.

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iLHP: Hi Herbert, thank you for speaking with us today. Could you please tell us about yourself? 

Herbert: Hi Ed. I grew up in Germany in a family full of photographers and so it was inevitable that I’ve learned that stuff right as a child. My very first camera was a Voigtländer Vito B and I started with black and white film which our father developed in his darkroom.

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I’ve used that camera quite some years until my interest shifted a bit when I was a young man. Later and when digital photography emerged and since the introduction of mirror-less cameras, photography gained my attention again and today it’s my hobby and passion.

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iLHP: I first came across your work via your website called Variety of Light. Your works are gorgeously cinematic in terms of composition but especially tone and color. How did you develop your style? 

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Architectural Photography with Andreas Bildgestalter

Andreas Bildgestalter is one of those amateur photographers whose talent is outstanding and should be showcased widely in the photography world. iLHP is constantly on the lookout to find new talents and showcase professionals as well as amateurs who produce constantly breathtaking pictures. Andreas is one of them in his field: Architecture. His world is made of straight lines, tight curves and with a lot of purity. Let’s discover together his philosophy. Don’t miss out the link below to the “making of” of his most rewarded photograph!

iLHP: First of all, thank you very much Andreas for taking the time to answer to our questions. How long have you been into photography?

Andreas: I’m into photography since the beginning of 2011. I’ve been interested in photography before but never really jumped in it until then. I did shoot with a small digital camera during vacations though, and I bought my first digital reflex camera, which was a NIKON D90.

Meet

iLHP: How old are you if I may ask and where do you live?

Andreas: I’m 50 years old and I live in Gelsenkirchen which is a town in the Ruhrarea in West-Germany. It’s quite a good and central location to reach a lot of places around which are interesting for me.

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iLHP: Did you learn by yourself or through photography schools? Continue reading Architectural Photography with Andreas Bildgestalter