Tag Archives: film

Follow Michel D’Oultremont On The Trail Of Wild Bison

As you all know now, we, at iLHP, love wildlife photography and try to share with you interviews with great photographers in that field. You probably remember that we interviewed this fantastic young photographer (here), Michel D’Oultremont who had just won the Rising Star Award of the BBC Wildlife and the  Fritz Polking Nachwuchspreis. Michel is coming back, but this time, with a truly beautiful and meaningful video. Please see below the press release and the video. Enjoy!

“During the shoot luck wasn’t really on our side as the animals were very discreet. That’s also what makes wildlife photography so special; nothing is ever guaranteed. The final film is incredible and I think that phrase ‘the wait’ perfectly encompasses the tough conditions we were in.”

Photographer, Michel D’Oultremont

‘THE WAIT’ – FROM A LONDON GALLERY TO THE BIG SCREEN

FILMMAKERS FOLLOW YOUNG PHOTOGRAPHY TALENT ON THE TRAIL OF WILD BISON

In 2014, at just 22 years of age, the Belgian wildlife photographer Michel D’Oultremont made his name on the international scene by winning the ‘Rising Star’ award at the National History Museum’s annual ‘Wildlife Photographer of the Year’ exhibition.

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10 Crazy Camera Co. & Designer Collaborations

Hello Kitty & Leica? Stella McCartney & Canon? Instagram & Polaroid? Collaborations between big name brands have been an innovative way to appeal to a broader market. Loyal consumers of one brand are also likely to own a product by the other, or they may at least be within the same target demographic. Therefore, as corporate synergy goes, advertisers can readily be enticed into this new market and the consumers will love the exclusivity of the particular item for sale.

karl lagerfeld coke
Your regular $1.50 can of Diet Coke. Slap on Karl Lagerfeld’s name, and they become collector’s items with a resale value at almost €50.

Usually, the joint venture is done by producing limited quantities and therefore, making the item more desirable and exclusive. To the consumer that seeks these specialty items, obtaining one of the limited edition items released can become a must-have obsession.

Often times, one of the brands participating in the collaboration can be extremely popular in the mainstream market while the other brand is a little more underground or haute couture. By creating such an unconventional union, this is generally the formula for a perfect marriage and can sequentially appeal to a mass number of the population.

Here are some great camera collaborations:


10) Leica & Paul Smith

Leica X2 Paul Smith

Paul Smith is a British fashion designer who has been in the clothing business for over 40 years. In late 2012, Leica approached Smith about joining together to design a camera that represents the Paul Smith brand. As a photography enthusiast Smith gladly accepted. The collaboration was for the limited edition X2 camera and releasing only 1500 cameras.

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9 Great Documentaries on Photography, Art, and Design

To take beautiful pictures you must understand what is beautiful. Aesthetics, taste, and style defines an artist. Even if you are born naturally enough with a fantastic eye, it still must be developed, cultivated, and matured. Everything else is technique, which is mechanical and can be easily learned by anyone. Being a good photographer is no different. It’s not just about knowing the camera settings, how to manipulate light, or how to choose the right gear. It’s about being able to appreciate what is beautiful, what is different, what is unique, and sharing your vision with the rest of the world.

One accessible way of developing your tastes is to study what society considers beautiful. It’s a starting point. Yes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder and tastes differ, but it’s not as purely subjective as you may think. Having studied enough of it, you’ll soon realize that there are repeating themes, rhythms, and philosophies that transcend. Here are 9 fairly popular selections I have chose for you to explore.

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Cult Cameras – The Yashica T4 Super D (Part 2: Film vs. Digital)

In Part 1, we introduced you to the cult camera that is the Yashica T4, made famous by Terry Richardson. And as discussed before, Film is Dead. In terms of the economics, the way we consume photography has changed to the point where 35mm film is relegated to a niche for hobbyists, purists, and hipsters. Film will never see the mainstream light of day again. But, when the automobile took over for the horses, we still loved our steeds. Today, we still love film. Instagram, Facebook, and the native iPhone Camera app all have “filters” to emulate the film look. Is it just nostalgia? Or is there something missing from digital?

Digital Sterility vs. Film Texture

Do you remember the Super 8? The film movie cameras, not the motel chain. It was slightly before my time, but I certainly recognize it when I see it. If you take a look at the Lexus commercial below, it captures the feeling of “film” very well.

Film has a texture to it, or as Patrick Bateman might say, “the tasteful thickness of it“. It is a feeling that digital doesn’t have. Digital is clean, precise, and sterile. The way our Bayesian sensors interpolate color and light is just fundamentally different from photo reactive emulsions on acetate. Neither one is “better” than the other. You can make the same argument against film, that it cannot reproduce the “grainless” look of digital. The two mediums are just “different.”

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Film is Dead.

But it’s not extinct. Much like when automobiles took over for the horses, our equine friends didn’t disappear. Shooting film, much like horseback riding, has become a hobby but not as a means of everyday life. It’s not personal. It’s a matter of economics. The way we consume photography has changed. We no longer read the paper, buy magazines, or sit around the coffee table sharing vacation albums. The majority of us don’t anyways. The next generation certainly won’t. We get everything through a screen. It’s simply too much trouble to shoot on film and transfer them onto a screen.

Purists and traditionalists will cling onto the “good old days” insisting that “those” were the better times. Vinyl will always sound better. Film will always look better. Nostalgia will always feel better. We can either grow a hipster beard and pretend to live in the past, or try on a pair of Google glasses and learn to love the future. Let’s give film, a twenty-one gun send off. Here’s to you, an ode to film.

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