Tag Archives: famous photographers

And What If The Gear Was Also What Makes… You a Better Photographer?

Of course, it’s the photographer who takes/makes the photograph. I’ve always said that but in the end, isn’t it a little demagogic. I know I’m not going to make a lot of friends saying this but, I do not completely agree when I hear that the equipment is not the photographer. Of course it is the photographer … at least partially! There are too many ingredients that makes that a photo will touch other people for us to exclude THIS reason. An 85mm f/1.4 is quite superior to a 28-70mm f3.5/5.6. And what if behind this “truth”, were hiding other feelings…

Photography is intimately linked to camera equipment. For a singer for instance, there is really no artifice. But a picture, it is different …

Talent is obviously above the material contingencies but with very good material it is better expressed if not simply expressed themselves. Cartier-Bresson worked with Leica, Vincent Munier, with the latest Nikkor telephoto lenses and Ussain Bolt does not beat his records with my sneakers! (Read our article about the favorite lenses of famous photographers)

Talent is obviously above the material contingencies but with very good material it is even better expressed!

So we all agree that these talented characters would still be very talented with low-end gear. But why be masochistic and work with cheap equipment just because we have talent? And why, if you have no talent – in one’s opinion – shouldn’t we use a wonderful lens? There, I think we will all agree.

What can this old saying be hiding in the back of our heads?

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I am aware that I therefore address a very tricky topic because often visceral. There are so many different ways to take photographs! With very simple equipment or very complex, very expensive or just very affordable, like your smartphone. Very pragmatic or artful, with or without talent …

So what about those who want this specific lens and, conversely, those who say that the material does not make you a better photographer. Here is what I think and here is my feeling about this: Continue reading And What If The Gear Was Also What Makes… You a Better Photographer?

Who are the Professional Photographers who Switched to the Sony A7 Series?

We keep on hearing a lot about the A7 series and that many pros are leaving their beloved DSLRs for this new series of cameras. Especially with the latest announcement with the A7r mark II (7 game changing features of the A7rII) which, undeniably, is a breakthrough in the aging DSLR world. Seeing the A7 mark II (A7II Field test) and now the A7rII, I can’t help thinking that, excepted for the Nikon D810 and the D750, all other DSLRs are now a huge step behind considering the new possibilities and the versatility that this new camera offers.

Canon with its brand new 5Ds and 5Dsr did not really convince anybody. DxOLab said it is Canon’s best score ever but it is still ranked at the 21st position, far behind the Nikon D810 and the Sony A7r. Let’s imagine the score of the A7rII. Phenomenal. Don’t take me wrong though, the 5DIII is still a very good camera, but it needs a major overhaul to fight against the upcoming A7rII. That being said, some professionals have already made the switch seeing the great potential in these new kind of full frame cameras, probably even more once the A7rII will be available. So I wanted to provide an example of some great professional photographers that are pleased with their new system.

“I’ve got the greatest job in the world. My worst days as a photographer might be the greatest days in the lives of many people.” — Brian Smith

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Serge Ramelli (his 2 websites here: 1 / 2), Michael Shainblum,  Brian Smith and David Mclain are among these, respectively switching from the Canon 5DIII to the A7r and from the Canon 5DII to the A7s, Brian and David, as Sony Artisans, are using several Sony cameras. Trey Ratcliff is also a fantastic pro photographer shooting with the A7r and the A6000. I’m not talking about Jason Lanier switching from Nikon to the A7s as he is really not my favorite photographer, same for Gary Fong but I put the link and you can check it out for yourself. But besides them, amateurs and enthusiasts photographers switching to the A7 series, there are also more and more “common” professional photographers making the switch like wedding photographers. Will Chao is one of them. He has just switched from the Canon 5DIII, again, to the A7 mark II. Continue reading Who are the Professional Photographers who Switched to the Sony A7 Series?

Favorite Lenses of Famous Photographers

As much as photographers distance themselves from their cameras, saying that it is merely a tool, photography as a whole is much more intertwined with technology than traditional art. Our cameras and our lenses set the boundaries of our perspectives. This is why, we’d thought it’d be interesting to look at some famous photographer’s favorite lenses.

We’ve compiled a list of 7 famous photographers. We wanted to see if there is a trend. Are 85mm lenses really the preferred portrait focal length or is it more marketing? Is the 24-70mm  zoom really the industry workhorse? We wanted to see if there is reason behind the madness.

Henri Cartier-Bresson (50mm)

Genre: Street and Photojournalism

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One of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s most famous photographs, a man jumping over a puddle taken at the right moment.

The father of photojournalism, Henri Cartier-Bresson is a master of candid street photography and an early adopter of the 35mm format. He helped develop street photography back in the 1940s and 50s with  his Leica rangefinder and a 50mm prime.

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In an interview with the NY Times, he said:

“[The 50] corresponds to a certain vision and at the same time has enough depth of focus, a thing you don’t have in longer lenses. I worked with a 90. It cuts much of the foreground if you take a landscape, but if people are running at you, there is no depth of focus. The 35 is splendid when needed, but extremely difficult to use if you want precision in composition. There are too many elements, and something is always in the wrong place. It is a beautiful lens at times when needed by what you see.”

Continue reading Favorite Lenses of Famous Photographers