Tag Archives: depth of field

“Fringing”?! Photography Slang Explained

Photography can be a pretty mysterious world with a lot of weird slang that general public and amateurs, but also enthusiasts or even pros, find difficult to understand. Are you often confused by some of the things your photographer friends say? Like any hobby or pastime, there are common photography terms that we all come to learn, and then there is some of the more bizarre slang you can spend a lifetime behind the lens never understanding. Below we’ve compiled a collection of common photography slang and obscure camera acronyms to help lift the veil on their mystery.

Photo provided by Patricia Chica
Photo and cover photo provided by Patricia Chica

This is by no means a complete list. In fact, if there’s something we’ve missed feel free to add your own in the comments below – just keep it clean, people…

Continue reading “Fringing”?! Photography Slang Explained

Got GAS? Honest Questions We Need to Ask Ourselves

So here I am, thinking about dropping some hard earned cash on another camera system. I’ve definitely been a sucker for hype and the latest generation of cameras have lured hours of my attention from actual work. Maybe I was going to procrastinate either way, but at the end of this tunnel, I will probably be losing a hefty amount of cash to replace it with several hundred grams of magnesium alloy housing some serious CMOS circuitry.

Photographer or Photo Enthusiast?

As large camera manufacturers start churning out the hype machines, many photo-enthusiasts will start salivating for these new imaging monsters; bigger resolution, better dynamic range, higher sensitivity, faster processing, more connectivity, etc. It’s enough to make you go out and justify maxing out your credit card in order to ignite a spark that hasn’t been lit since the last time you purchased a camera.

But before you do that, you need to ask yourself this question: What do I need this for? It’s pretty simple but for many, this could be like walking through a land mine.

It doesn't matter how good your gear is, if you're not going out there photographing then you've purchased yourself an expensive paper weight. This sunrise shot of the Sydney Harbour Bridge was captured at 5am.
It doesn’t matter how good your gear is, if you’re not going out there photographing then you’ve purchased yourself an expensive paper weight. This sunrise shot of the Sydney Harbour Bridge was captured at 5am. I’m not an early bird but when you get shots like this, it’s enough to get me out of bed!

As mirrorless  cameras start eating away at DSLR sales worldwide, the old guard of photography; primarily Nikon, Canon and Pentax have been trying to stop the hemorrhaging of their entry level and enthusiast range of cameras.

To this day, nothing excites me more than placing my eye against my Canon 5D Mk III eye piece and seeing a tried and tested system in that reflex but for many, it’s totally unnecessary to carry a bigger, heavier camera all for the sake of that mirror box . You see, many families now want great image quality without carrying the big DSLR, these mirrorless cameras can provide just that but on the other end of the spectrum, enthusiasts might require a sturdier built machine that can withstand nature’s elements.

Continue reading Got GAS? Honest Questions We Need to Ask Ourselves

Are the Extra Dollars Worth the Upgrade to the Full Frame Sensor?

Most professional photographers work with full frame cameras. No surprise here, it is known to yield the best image quality. That said, the latest APS-C size sensors have improved drastically lately. The Sony A6000 and the Nikon D7200 and the D5300 are the proof that this sensor size can be excellent (for the most camera geeks of you, you will have noticed that these 3 have the same 24.3MP Sony sensor but Nikon has its own way of working with it).

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This test here is showing how close it can be. The gap seems to get smaller and smaller lately, so is it worth upgrading your gear to have a full frame sensor knowing a full frame camera and all the lenses are significantly more expensive? There are many criteria to take into account.

Investing into a camera system can be very costly. The body itself is expensive but the lenses are the most expensive purchases. Fortunately, the lenses can last for decades if well maintained and treated. They also lose less value over time then the camera body. But even if we can change the camera body relatively more easily, the system we invest in determines the lenses you will buy.

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Questions: Is it worth investing in a full frame sensor nowadays knowing the APS-C size (and even the micro 4/3rd sensors to a lower extent) have a great image quality, most of the time similar?What criteria are to take into account?

Continue reading Are the Extra Dollars Worth the Upgrade to the Full Frame Sensor?

Stuck at Home? Macro is your savior!

Why will macro-photography save you while you are stuck at home (especially during this season)? Because even if it’s freezing, pouring or stormy out there, you can always have fun with your camera at home. Of course, you could go out by stormy weather and that can give you great photographs, but if you don’t feel like it, just grab your macro equipment and have fun!

Getting Inspired

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“Seeds on Ice” | @ 90mm; f/4.5; 1/2500 sec; 100 ISO

I always keep at home things like dandelion seeds, feathers, flowers that I find in my garden, in public gardens or in the forest. You can bring out the photogenic aspects of these little things with good lighting and backgrounds. I had written an article before on “How to Get Artful droplets on Flower Petals” which was also completely made at home.

Minimalism: All About the Composition Continue reading Stuck at Home? Macro is your savior!

The Fairytale Garden

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Very design blade of grass with a dew drop at its end. The bokeh adds the magical atmosphere to this image. (90mm, f/3.2, 1/640 sec, 200 ISO)

Macro Photography is interesting as it allows us to see what we cannot plainly see with our eyes. A simple lawn with morning dew becomes a place where artistic subjects cohabits with bugs and incredible lansdscapes making a fairytale of all of these things.

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Snail on a flower petal at twilight (90mm, f/4, 1/100 sec, 320 ISO)

It’s also a very convenient photography field because you don’t need to live in a wonderful place or travel to fabulous countries to find artistic and amazing sceneries! Continue reading The Fairytale Garden