Tag Archives: 50mm

Got GAS? Honest Questions We Need to Ask Ourselves

So here I am, thinking about dropping some hard earned cash on another camera system. I’ve definitely been a sucker for hype and the latest generation of cameras have lured hours of my attention from actual work. Maybe I was going to procrastinate either way, but at the end of this tunnel, I will probably be losing a hefty amount of cash to replace it with several hundred grams of magnesium alloy housing some serious CMOS circuitry.

Photographer or Photo Enthusiast?

As large camera manufacturers start churning out the hype machines, many photo-enthusiasts will start salivating for these new imaging monsters; bigger resolution, better dynamic range, higher sensitivity, faster processing, more connectivity, etc. It’s enough to make you go out and justify maxing out your credit card in order to ignite a spark that hasn’t been lit since the last time you purchased a camera.

But before you do that, you need to ask yourself this question: What do I need this for? It’s pretty simple but for many, this could be like walking through a land mine.

It doesn't matter how good your gear is, if you're not going out there photographing then you've purchased yourself an expensive paper weight. This sunrise shot of the Sydney Harbour Bridge was captured at 5am.
It doesn’t matter how good your gear is, if you’re not going out there photographing then you’ve purchased yourself an expensive paper weight. This sunrise shot of the Sydney Harbour Bridge was captured at 5am. I’m not an early bird but when you get shots like this, it’s enough to get me out of bed!

As mirrorless  cameras start eating away at DSLR sales worldwide, the old guard of photography; primarily Nikon, Canon and Pentax have been trying to stop the hemorrhaging of their entry level and enthusiast range of cameras.

To this day, nothing excites me more than placing my eye against my Canon 5D Mk III eye piece and seeing a tried and tested system in that reflex but for many, it’s totally unnecessary to carry a bigger, heavier camera all for the sake of that mirror box . You see, many families now want great image quality without carrying the big DSLR, these mirrorless cameras can provide just that but on the other end of the spectrum, enthusiasts might require a sturdier built machine that can withstand nature’s elements.

Continue reading Got GAS? Honest Questions We Need to Ask Ourselves

Choosing the Ideal Macro Lens Focal Length

What is the difference between the 60mm, 100mm and 150mm macro lens? 

If you’re looking to purchase a DSLR macro lens for the first time, it’s easy to get confused by the range that is available. To be considered as a macro lens, the lens must feature a 1:1 magnification, meaning that the object will be reproduced at its actual size on the sensor. depending on the practice you have, you’ll need different length of macro lenses. But let’s define what macro photography is.

What is Macro Photography?

Eye macro lens - iLHP
(Photo credit: Suren Manvelyan)

But first, what is macro photography? It’s pretty hard to define. We all have our own appreciation of the distance it should be to be considered macro. Usually people tend to call everything macro as long as it is a general close-up. It actually gathers 3 types of categories:

Continue reading Choosing the Ideal Macro Lens Focal Length

Gravity Defying Ballet Dancer and Photographer Mickael Jou

Levitation is an emerging field of photography as you all know. Different techniques can be used (here’s a tutorial of a multi-exposure levitation technique), but the grace and elegance shown by Mickael Jou is simply outstanding. 

iLHP is very proud to say that this is the first detailed interview of this magnificent, poetic and graceful ballet dancer. He used to practice ballet and modern dance routines on the streets of Paris, where tourists would often photograph and film him. This gave him the idea of capturing portraits of himself and start a 365 day photo project showing his elegant, gravity-defying dance moves in spectacular snapshots.

“Whatever you’re doing, someone else probably already did it better than you. But that doesn’t mean that you cannot work to be better than them.”

EF 50mm f/1.2L | @ 50mm; f/1.4; 1/640 sec; 400 ISO
EF 50mm f/1.2L | @ 50mm; f/1.4; 1/640 sec; 400 ISO

iLHP: Thank you very much Mickael for taking the time to answer our questions! Please, tell us a bit about yourself.

Continue reading Gravity Defying Ballet Dancer and Photographer Mickael Jou

From Russia with Love – Elena Shumilova

Elena Shumilova takes intimate photographs of her 2 sons with their pets in their farm in Russia. Trivial ? Not so much actually. the quality of her shots made exclusively with natural light are breathtaking.

She used to be an architect but the success and the raise of her children took all of her time, she’s now completely devoted to her passion which is photography.

Elena-Shumilova-photographe-02

She uses her Canon 5D mark II and essentially 2 lenses of her own: Continue reading From Russia with Love – Elena Shumilova

Lens Shootout – Leica Summaron 35mm f/2.8 v. Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f/1.8

The biggest and oldest names in the photography industry has got to be Leica and Zeiss. Carl Zeiss AG was founded in 1846 in Jena, Germany as a optical systems manufacturer and Leitz Camera GmbH (now Leica) was founded in 1849  in Wetzlar, Germany. Both companies have seen their market share tumble since the Japanese combined high quality optics and manufacturing along with reliability, innovation, and affordability. But Leica and Zeiss are survivors, and within the last few years there seem to a strong resurgence with these two old storied brands.

Summaron v Sonnar

In my stable of lenses, I have the Leica Summaron 35mm f/2.8 and the Zeiss Sonnar *T 55mm f/1.8. Both 35mm and 50mm lenses are considered “normal primes,” great for street photography and general purpose photography. I’ve had the pleasure of using these over the last few months now, so I thought I’d do a brief comparison review.

Continue reading Lens Shootout – Leica Summaron 35mm f/2.8 v. Zeiss Sonnar 55mm f/1.8