32 Things Photographers Say And What They Really Mean

Photography has a language all of its own (Photography Slang Explained); a rich mix of camera jargon, lens acronyms and technical buzzwords that can be an utterly baffling sea of noise to beginners. But, with the internet and all, it doesn’t take long to know your f-stops from your fill-flash, and be able to separate HDR, DOF and TTL.

Forget photography slang terms and DSLR doublespeak, though. It’s the other things that photographers say – or rather don’t say – that are often more confusing. When a fellow photographer says that they’re ‘completely self-taught’ what are they actually trying to tell us?

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If they describe themselves as a ‘fine-art’ landscape photographer, what are they really trying to say? Some of the things that spill from the mouths of photographers are loaded with double meaning…

To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of things that photographers say, and provided translations of their true meanings. Just remember that the purpose is also to have some self introspection and some humor is needed!

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http://www.whattheduck.net/

When photographers say…
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Breaking the Rules – Street Photography with the Rokinon 14mm f/2.8

We’d normally use ultra-wide lenses for two reasons: (1)  to capture something very big (i.e. landscapes, buildings, stars in the sky); or (2) to create a sense of space in a place where there is none (i.e. real estate photography). Portraits are generally a big no-no because its inherent visual perspective creates a sense of unease. But then again, a cinematographer like Masanobu Takayanagi can use it masterfully in Silver Linings Playbook to subtly bring out Bradley Cooper’s troubled mental state in front of Jennifer Lawrence.

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Ian Norman over at The Lonely Speck uses this Rokinon to great results for his astrophotography

I bought my Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 on a whim and while it was on sale. At $339 MSRP, it is one of the most affordable lenses in the Sony E Mount line up. But as neither a landscape or an astrophotographer, I had no real need for an ultra-wide. And I suspect for real-estate photographers, who incidentally have the highest average salaries out of all photographer types, they won’t be relying on this bargain basement lens with wild barrel distortions either.

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The Rokinon is also labeled as the Samyang. When mounted to the A7 series, it is absolutely humongous. Not the ideal street photography lens then, but fun to use nonetheless.

One day, over better qualified candidates like the Zeiss 55mm f/1.8 and as if to defy the camera gods, I decided to bring this lens during my recent trip to China for Lunar New Years since Asia, in general, is great for street photography. So, I challenged myself to use a 14mm ultra-wide on the streets and this is what I’ve learned.

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Photographing “China B”

Spanning into the mists of time, its history has predicated thousands of years of philosophies, dogmas, and customs. It’s population, a conceptually difficult to imagine 1,357,000,000, is ultra diverse in its cultures, languages, and cuisines. It’s also very large, the same size as the United States, as it borders 14 adjacent developing countries.

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Shanghai, or as Anthony Bourdain put it, as city that makes his New York City look like a third world country.

What many envision China today, perhaps through news programs, tourism, or the Beijing Olympics, may be a rapidly developing economy with shining beacon cities like Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Beijing. However, few casual tourists or tie-wearing business people will have the opportunity to venture into China’s countryside, to rural roads less traveled, and to what one scholar termed as “China B.”

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Power lines stretch across resting winter farmlands.

In my recent travels to China during Lunar New Years, I had the opportunity to travel to an old town on the outskirts of Xi’an, in the Shanxi province, right in the middle of the country. Along the 1.5 hour car ride, I pointed my Sony A7 out the window and capture a side of the country rarely seen. Every image below was shot with a Sony A7 with a Zeiss 35mm f/2.8. The lens focused quickly and confidently, but it was the micro-contrast of the images that really inspired.

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“Fringing”?! Photography Slang Explained

Photography can be a pretty mysterious world with a lot of weird slang that general public and amateurs, but also enthusiasts or even pros, find difficult to understand. Are you often confused by some of the things your photographer friends say? Like any hobby or pastime, there are common photography terms that we all come to learn, and then there is some of the more bizarre slang you can spend a lifetime behind the lens never understanding. Below we’ve compiled a collection of common photography slang and obscure camera acronyms to help lift the veil on their mystery.

Photo provided by Patricia Chica
Photo and cover photo provided by Patricia Chica

This is by no means a complete list. In fact, if there’s something we’ve missed feel free to add your own in the comments below – just keep it clean, people…

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What Can We Expect From A Sony A7III/Mark 3?

We are used to see Sony release new cameras at a tremendous pace. Each and every year we have a new camera, The A7II has been released just a year after the A7, same thing with the A7r/ A7rII and A7s/A7sII. The all new A7rII is literally a flagship for Sony as it encompasses all the new technologies Sony has been working on the past few years, especially with the 5 axis stabilization combined with the world premier full frame back-lit sensor. That being said, we’re not going to detail all the great features housed by the A7rII, the A7sII or the entry level A7II. Instead, I’d like to imagine what the A7III would be like. Sony always introduces the A7 then A7r and quickly after the A7s series, hense the next body in that series would be the A7III.

Sony A7III rumors - iLHP

However, it is important to note that the A7II was released in January 2015, a little bit more than a year ago which means that Sony decided to change and slow down its pace in the race to the best mirrorless camera. Is it a good or bad thing, I will let you be the judge of their strategy. But in my opinion, this is a very good thing. First, it will settle down the image of the cameras and they will lose less value with time, making them appear more credible and valuable against CaNikon competitors, and second, it shows that Sony is focusing more on developing the E-mount lenses. Knowing this, we can assume that this system will arrive to a certain maturity by the end of 2016 ( especially as Zeiss declared to iLHP being ready to release 2-3 E-mount lenses in 2016 and 2-3 others in 2017, 5 in total). Considering the success of this system, third party manufacturers will also get more involved and start to produce lenses as well. Sigma, for instance, has been stressed a lot in the past few months by A7 consumers and prosumers to produce their ART series for the E-mount.

Sony A7rII iLHP

But this new strategy will not prevent Sony from innovating again. They literately attacked Canon and Nikon by creating a new market and taking a significant share of the whole DSLR/mirrorless market. Without a doubt, Canon and Nikon will react within a year or two. Sony knows this and is obviously working on the A7II successor that we might be expecting for January 2017 if they want to stay ahead of the game.

What can we expect from an A7III?

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