Category Archives: Quick Tips & Tricks

5 Free University Courses on Photography

There is a lot of fluff on the internet, especially when it comes to photography techniques, style, and artistry. It is one of the main reasons why we decided to start iLHP, because there really wasn’t anything out there in-depth enough for us to find interesting. However, there is always a fine line between being informative and being entertaining. Our primary goal is still to entertain.

From time to time, we would like to point you to more detailed and technical articles on photography. In no particular order, here are 5 free online photography courses you can take from home.

5. University of New South Wales (Australia)

This one is a hidden gem of a resource for all aspects related to lighting. While mainly from a videography/cinematography perspective, much of the lighting principles, such as the 3-point lighting discussed in the video above, translates very well into photography.

2015-01-28 03.12.19 am

Their UNSW TV channel has a wide array of short video tutorials specific to lighting. Note however, a lot of their colloquial terms for lights are probably specific to Australia rather than used commonly world wide (e.g. dedolight). Overall, the videos are short, concise, and well paced.

Continue reading 5 Free University Courses on Photography

Macro Photography Tutorial by French Photographer Cyril Verron

You’ve dreamed about it? Here it is! As I promised you while sharing Cyril Verron’s interview, you can find here the tutorial of one of Cyril’s most outstanding pictures. I want to thank Cyril for revealing some of his secrets and of course for the time he took to share his knowledge with us. So without any further due, let’s start now!

First, let’s see its EXIF data obtained with his Canon 5D II and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens and then I let Cyril explain everything  (Editor’s note: Translated from French, descendez tout en bas pour voir la version Francaise):

Focale lenght : 100mm
ISO : 100
Aperture : f/3.5
Speed : 1/320 sec

In the Field

Draw The light Cyril Verron Tutoriel Interview2
This is how the picture came out of the camera without any editing.

They’re quite common data so let’s get an in-depth analysis with Cyril himself:

“Draw the light” is a photograph that I took in April 2012. At this time, I was especially working and training on my compositions without my own personalized settings that I use henceforth, like the white balance or the color saturation. Continue reading Macro Photography Tutorial by French Photographer Cyril Verron

10 Quick Tips for Shooting a Car Show

Here at iLHP, we are car lovers as well as camera lovers. So in celebration of the ongoing North American International Auto Show in Detroit and the many international shows to come, we’d like to take a moment to share 10 quick tips on photographing an auto show. For your convenience, below is also a list of some of the major car shows around the world this year.

2015 autoshow schedule
Current as of 1/2/2015

10. Avoiding the Crowds

If Transformers were real, they would come in this Lexus LF-C2.
If Transformers were real, they would come in this Lexus LF-C2.

Assuming you don’t have a press pass, timing determines whether or not your pictures will be filled with strangers. Try weekdays after work/school. Avoid opening day and weekends. I was at the LA auto show on a Monday. The convention center was nearly empty and I sat in every car I wanted. It made the experience that much more enjoyable.

9. Bring a Zoom Lens or a Wide Angle Prime

Zoom with a zoom lens, or zoom with your feet with a prime. The new Mercedes GLA getting the street art treatment.
Zoom with a zoom lens, or zoom with your feet with a prime. The new Mercedes GLA getting the street art treatment.

Car shows are dynamic affairs. Zoom lens, such as a Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L or a Nikon 24-120mm f/4G, are great for low light, variable distance shooting, and static subjects. Larger apertures are less important here because (a) car shows are usually well lit so ISO is less of a problem and (b) you’d want smaller apertures to capture more in focus.

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Stuck at Home? Macro is your savior!

Why will macro-photography save you while you are stuck at home (especially during this season)? Because even if it’s freezing, pouring or stormy out there, you can always have fun with your camera at home. Of course, you could go out by stormy weather and that can give you great photographs, but if you don’t feel like it, just grab your macro equipment and have fun!

Getting Inspired

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“Seeds on Ice” | @ 90mm; f/4.5; 1/2500 sec; 100 ISO

I always keep at home things like dandelion seeds, feathers, flowers that I find in my garden, in public gardens or in the forest. You can bring out the photogenic aspects of these little things with good lighting and backgrounds. I had written an article before on “How to Get Artful droplets on Flower Petals” which was also completely made at home.

Minimalism: All About the Composition Continue reading Stuck at Home? Macro is your savior!

Yale University’s Film Studies on Cinematography

Cinematography is closely related to photography. A lot of its principles in composition, lighting, and framing are analogous to still images, and without a doubt, cinema is the pinnacle of the visual-art medium for the last hundred years. During my online research, I came across a wonderful resource that is full of easily digestible information. It is the website for Film Analysis at the Yale University.

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