How to Shoot Zombies

If there is a zombie apocalypse tomorrow, what would you do? Head to the nearest Costco and barricade yourself? Load up at the Guns & Ammo store? Sail to the nearest deserted island?

What if you did none of those things by becoming a badass zombie photographer, live to tell about it, and have the photos to show for it? At iLHP, we don’t think you should let a little thing like zombie stop you from enjoying your camera.

Speed + Portability = Survivability 

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Medyan Dairieh as a badass wartime photojournalist. Photo from https://www.guernicamag.com/interviews/fisher_03_15_2012/

Shooting zombies is all about shooting on the go. Your subjects are moving, sometimes fast moving depending on how they became zombies or whether they have become militarized. You are trying to capture the Henri Cartier Bresson “moment” while trying to stay one step ahead of a nasty ankle biter. Speed and portability means survivability. This is action photography.

This means, ditch your Manfrotto tripod and your 60″ Photek Softlighter. Lose your roller case and your heavy backpack. I would suggest this 26 pocketed vest with a laptop pocket, packed with fully charged batteries and empty memory cards. You never know when you’ll have a moment to charge those batteries or clear out those mem cards, so better bring extras. Plus, you’ll need a laptop to post process those keepers. I would also bring a sturdy monopod with a spiked foot, for stabilizing shots and for stabbing zombies.

Continue reading How to Shoot Zombies

Landscape Photographer Patrick Colpron, aka @CandidCameraMan

I think that the reason my passion for photography developed so greatly and quickly was due to photo sharing on Instagram. I had recently switched from a Blackberry to an iPhone and was thrilled to finally download the Instagram app. I saw so many iPhone users post images on Instagram and share on Facebook.

I started primarily following Instagrammers from the Paris area that shot similar images like myself.  When I knew I was moving back to Toronto I began following people from the Toronto area as well.  One of my favourite photographers I came across was Patrick Colpron, commonly known on Instagram as CandidCameraMan.  When I arrived back in Toronto I reached out to Patrick and asked if he wanted to shoot together sometime.  I never thought he would respond nor agree to meet up.  He gracefully accepted.  From that point on we met on several occasions to shoot around the city, sometimes just a few of us and other times in rather large groups.

Patrick has always been very helpful and willing to share his tricks and techniques.  For those of you who don’t know him, we thought it would be nice to introduce him to our iLHP readers.

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Continue reading Landscape Photographer Patrick Colpron, aka @CandidCameraMan

How to Shoot like Annie Leibovitz – (Part 2: The Setup)

In Part 1, we set out to study one aspect of Annie Leibovitz’s legendary body of work, her Vanity Fair style fashion shoots. Her subjects are statically posed,  bathed in ultra soft moon lighting, and, more of often than not, positioned in front of an expensive canvas background.

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It’d be silly to suggest the following setup guide will work in every situation. Annie’s certainly not a one-trick pony. Especially if the shoot is outdoors where you have to manage the daylight. But think of it as a starting point to Annie’s look, an introduction, to one of the cleanest yet most elegant looks defining our era.

Annie’s Lighting Setup

Behind the scenes video of Annie's Game of Thrones shoot
Behind the scenes video of Annie’s Game of Thrones shoot

Continue reading How to Shoot like Annie Leibovitz – (Part 2: The Setup)

5 Reasons Why Primes Are Better Than Zooms

Beginners can sometimes be surprised when they discover you have such an expensive camera and yet you are not able to zoom with it. “In 2014, we have good enough technology to make zooms in every camera,” one of my friends told me once.

However, the performance of the primes lenses is important for a lot of photography areas. I do think primes are better than zooms for different reasons and aspects. Here I am about to tell you why:

5) Value

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You can get very good prime lenses for a reasonable amount of money. Usually, 35 and 50mm f/1.8 are so common they are now quite cheap. Even the Rokinon 85mm f/1.4 is available at around $300. For such a nice and sharp piece of glass, it’s pretty affordable, believe me. For this price, you will have one constraint though. It’s full manual, so no image stabilization and no autofocus. As pointed out in one of our previous article, it’s not always  a problem especially for short focals. Unless you need a very long focal lenght like 300 or 500mm, most are good and affordable. For the price of one zoom you can often have 2 primes. Continue reading 5 Reasons Why Primes Are Better Than Zooms

One Is Such A Lonely Number. Or Is it?

When I began taking photos, it was done predominately with my iPhone 4S and when I was alone.  Occasionally I would lug about my Leica when I believed I would encounter something  so phenomenal that my iPhone would not be capable of capturing the reality of the image.  I was residing in Paris and would be walking around and desire to stop recurrently to capture something that caught my eye. It became so infectious that when I was out with friends I would pause mid-conversation, stop and snap a photo.  My friends would tend to get annoyed that my picture taking would interfere with our conversation and take away our precious time together.  Photography gradually began to become somewhat of an obsession.

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Instead of annoying whomever I was with at the time, I would venture off unaccompanied to explore the city and be able to take photos without hearing any complaints.  I wanted to upgrade from my iPhone, to improve the quality of my photos, so I had my ancient Canon shipped from back home in Toronto to Paris.  Continue reading One Is Such A Lonely Number. Or Is it?